Event information

17 March 2018, 14:00-16:00
Register start 5 March 2018
Register end 17 March 2018

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War, Military Operations and Armament: Evolution and Challenges

Military Briefings

British troops exercise in Estonia as part of the NATO's eFP (Enhanced Forward Presence) British troops exercise in Estonia as part of the NATO's eFP (Enhanced Forward Presence)

Warfare continues to undergo rapid evolution in the 21st century, and states’ global military expenditure remains very high. While inter-state warfare has significantly diminished, other forms of conflict situations, particularly non-international armed conflicts, persist worldwide. This has had an impact on the nature and conduct of military operations, which today strive to control the level of violence in a conflict situation rather than achieve “victory” in the usual sense of the word. The development of new weapons systems, including advances in the field of biotech and nanotech, could produce game-changers whose implications are difficult to foresee. The speaker will address these and other major issues in order to map the key ingredients that will spell out the future of war.

Briefing By

Capitaine de vaisseau Erwan Roche, Etat-major des armées (Defense Staff), France.

Captain Roche is a submariner and weapons officer specialized in ballistic missiles and naval warfare. He has worked in arms control in Paris and Geneva as defense attaché and military advisor at the Disarmament Conference.

Audience and Registration

This Military Briefing is primarily open to Geneva Academy’s students, who are prioritized in the allocation of seats (external persons may participate provided that there is sufficient room left).

Interested students and external participants need to register to attend this event via this online form.

About Military Briefings

Military Briefings are a unique series of events relating to military institutions and the law. They aim to improve our students’ knowledge of military actors and operations and build bridges between the military and civilian worlds.

Location

Auditorium Jacques Freymond, Rue de Lausanne 132, Geneva

Access

By Bus

From Geneva central train station, both Bus n°1 and n°25 (direction: ‘Jardin Botanique’) will take you from Cornavin train station to the Jacques Freymond Auditorium, located at the bus stop called ‘Secheron’.

Parking

Public parking is available in front of the Villa Barton or at La Perle du Lac.

Access for People with Disabilities

The Jacques Freymond Auditorium is accessible to people with disabilities. If you have a disability or any additional needs and require assistance in order to participate fully, please email info[at]geneva-academy.ch

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