Information

4-31 January 2017
Application start 7 November 2016
Application end 20 April 2017
Fee: 1150

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The Classification of Armed Conflicts

Syria, Old city of Aleppo. Destructed houses situated next to the frontline stand side by side alongside intact houses full of occupants just a few meters away from the frontline Syria, Old city of Aleppo. Destructed houses situated next to the frontline stand side by side alongside intact houses full of occupants just a few meters away from the frontline

Descriptive

This course aims to study, in depth, an emblematic example of the complexity of international humanitarian law (IHL) and the challenges it raises: the classification of armed conflicts (ACs). The course first analyzes the contours of the various categories of ACs (e.g. international AC, internationalized non-international ACs, wars of national liberation, belligerent occupations, high-intensity and low-intensity non-international ACs) in connection with the traditional distinction between non-international and international ACs. The course then questions the relevance of this last distinction in light of the requirements of contemporary ACs and the increased role played by independent actors within them. The course relies, as much as possible, on concrete examples illustrating the different categories of ACs and the controversies they raise.

Audience

This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

Schedule

  • Thursday 27 April, 18:00-20:30
  • Thursday 11 May, 18:00-20:30
  • Thursday 18 May, 18:00-20:30
  • Thursday 25 May, 18:00-20:30
  • Thursday 1 June, 18:00-20:30

Certificate

Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).

How to Apply

Applications for individual courses must be submitted via the online form.
If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

Your application will need to include:

  • An application letter, stating the specific course you are applying for and your motivation for participation
  • Your curriculum vitae
  • Copies of relevant degrees and diplomas
  • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
  • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.

Professor and Lecturer

Picture of Jérôme de Hemptinne

Jérôme de Hemptinne

Lecturer at the Universities of Louvain, Strasbourg and Lille, and Researcher at the Geneva Academy

Jérôme de Hemptinne's research focuses on modes of liability for international crimes, the qualification of armed conflicts and institutional aspects of international criminal courts and tribunals.

Location

Villa Moynier, 120B Rue de Lausanne, Geneva

Access

Public Transport

Tram 15, Direction Nations - tram stop Butini

Bus 1 or 25, Direction Jardin Botanique - bus stop Sécheron

Access for people with disabilities

Villa Moynier is accessible to people with disabilities. If you have a disability or any additional needs and require assistance in order to participate fully, please email info@geneva-academy.ch

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