Leading Academics Will Address the Use of Less-Lethal Weapons for Law Enforcement Purpose

A desk with books and publications A desk with books and publications

Leading academics, law enforcement experts and practitioners from different regions and legal backgrounds, and representatives from international organizations and civil society will join an academic working group to discuss use of force challenges in different contexts.

This academic working-group will address strategic approaches and responses to specific use of force issues like less lethal weapons, crowd control or the use of new technologies. Its composition will vary according to the topics discussed.

‘It was important for us to bring together leading use of force actors and institutions to reflect upon existing challenges and the way to address them’ underlines Kamelia Kemileva, Executive Manager at the Geneva Academy.

Under the Umbrella of the Geneva Human Rights Platform

This academic working-groups forms part of the Geneva Human Rights Platform, which notably focuses on current human rights challenges related to the use of force.

‘The Geneva Human Rights Platform, hosted by the Geneva Academy, provides a dynamic forum in Geneva for all stakeholders in the field of human rights to discuss and debate topical issues and challenges’ recalls Kamelia Kemileva. ‘The objective is to foster interactions and discussions on topical issues and challenges through regular events, conferences, expert roundtables and private meetings’ she adds.

 A Focus on Less-Lethal Weapons for Law Enforcement Purposes

The academic working-group will start working on the issue of less-lethal weapons (LLW) for law enforcement purposes, related human rights challenges and the lack of international regulation and standards.

The objective is to develop a document to guide practice concerning the use of LLW and other equipment in law enforcement. This document will build on, and in no way challenge or update, the UN Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Officials and the UN Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials.

‘This issue is currently discussed at the UN Human Rights Council, at the UN Human Rights Committee and at the Conference on Disarmament, but also at the national and regional levels. It is therefore important to provide guidance on the human rights challenges related to the use of LLW and how to address them’ underlines Kamelia Kemileva.

MORE ON THIS THEMATIC AREA

Session of the UN Committee against Racial Discrimination News

New Paper Examines the Diversity in Membership of the UN Human Rights Treaty Bodies

27 February 2018

Our new paper ‘Diversity in Membership of the UN Human Rights Treaty Bodies’ examines the composition of UN human rights treaty bodies (TBs) notably in relation to gender balance, geographical representation, as well as TBs members’ subject-matter expertise and professional background.

Read more

Persons at a desk and typing on their computer News

An Expert Seminar To Tackle Human Rights Challenges Related to the Use of Less-Lethal Weapons

19 June 2018

Our annual seminar, held in the context of the Geneva Human Rights Platform and its focus on current human rights challenges related to the use of force, will discuss the use of less-lethal weapons in the context of law enforcement, management of assemblies and crowd control.

Read more

Safe and rescue operation of a boat in the Mediterranean Sea. IHL Talks

Search and Rescue Obligations in the Mediterranean Sea

26 February 2019, 13:00-14:30

This IHL Talk will discuss the legal framework and the main critical questions related to search and rescue in the Mediterranean Sea, using concrete cases and examples to illustrate current issues and challenges.

Read more

Peru, Huancasancos. Vigil and burial ceremonies for the victims of the conflict whose remains were finally restituted to their families after 30 years of disappearance. Spring School

Confronting the Truth: The Functions, Practices and Challenges of Truth Commissions

2-4 April 2019

Truth Commissions are by now an integral part of the transitional justice vocabulary and practice. The 2019 Spring School will provide a comprehensive, multidimensional and practical examination of this transitional justice mechanism, shedding light on both its aims and the practical challenges it has met or is likely to meet.

Read more

An aerial view of camps for internally displaced persons (IDPs), which have appeared following latest attacks by M23 rebels and other armed groups in the North Kivu region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Short Course

International Refugee Law

8 March - 5 April 2019

This short course analyses the main international and regional norms governing the international protection of refugees. It notably examines the sources of international refugee law, including the 1951 Geneva Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, and their interaction with human rights law and international humanitarian law.

Read more

 Chittagong (Bangladesh) ship breaking yard Project

A Practitioners' Guide on Human Rights and Countering Corruption

Started in January 2015

This research project, aims via the drafting of a practitioners’ guide on human rights and countering corruption, to clarify the conceptual relationship between human rights, good governance and anticorruption, demonstrate the negative impact of corruption on human rights and provide guidance and make practical recommendations for effectively using the UN human rights system in anti-corruption efforts.

Read more