Master in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law: What our Students Say

Firouzeh Mitchell, student in the Geneva Academy's Master in Transitional Justice, in front of the Jet d'Eau Firouzeh Mitchell, student in the Geneva Academy's Master in Transitional Justice, in front of the Jet d'Eau

In this interview, Firouzeh Mitchell, currently enrolled in the Master of Advanced Studies in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law, tells us about the programme and life in Geneva.


Before studying at the Geneva Academy, Firouzeh, from Scotland, completed her LLB at the University of Glasgow, specializing in public international law.

Does the programme respond to your expectations?

Definitely. We are fortunate enough to be taught by leading experts in the field of transitional justice. We also have the opportunity to be surrounded by students from 26 different countries who can give a personal opinion on how their countries underwent transition. An aspect that I particularly enjoy is the cross-disciplinary approach to teaching, combining law, philosophy, history, and political science.

How is life in Geneva?

Being surrounded by the UN and many leading international organizations you really gain a practical understanding of how the things taught in class work in practice. It also means that you are surrounded by people from all over the world, giving you the chance to learn new languages and cultures. It is also a very photogenic city – with the beautiful lake, mountains (which I hope to learn to ski on!) and the old town.

Why did you choose to be photographed in front of the Jet d’Eau?

Getting a photo in front of the Jet d’Eau was one of the first things I did when I moved to Geneva. It is an iconic landmark of the city and it is rather entertaining trying to stand under it without getting soaked.

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