The Intersection between Transitional Justice, International Security and Responsibility to Protect

Started in February 2017

Security interests and humanitarian objectives as part of the responsibility to protect framework are fuelling military interventions whether within or outside the United Nations collective security system. Such foreign interventions raise major challenges for the design, legitimacy and local ownership of transitional justice processes that are limited to the accountability of local actors and towards local communities.

How can foreign interveners be held accountable? And to whom? These are key questions to be answered when analysing the intersection between transitional justice, international security and responsibility to protect. This project maps various existing accountability mechanisms through the lens of the requirements of a transitional justice process in order to identify possibilities and gaps.

Research outputs will be published by the end of 2017.

RESEARCHER

Picture of Sandra Krähenmann

Sandra Krähenmann

Research Fellow

Sandra Krähenmann's research focuses on the theory and practice of international law that applies in armed conflict and other situations of violence.

Publications

Cover of the book Post-Conflict Peacebuilding A Lexicon

Post-Conflict Peacebuilding - A Lexicon

January 2009

Vincent Chetail

Oxford University Press

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MORE ON THIS THEMATIC AREA

An ex-combatant holds up munitions in Attécoubé, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. He is one of several to have participated in a Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) operation conducted in the area by the UN mission, UNOCI. News

Disarmament And Today's Threats

May 2017

Our Executive Manager, Kamelia Kemileva, will participate on Wednesday, 10 May 2017 at lunchtime in a debate at the United Nations Office at Geneva on disarmament and today’s threats.

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Coverpage of the 2016 Annual Report News

2016 Annual Report

June 2017

Our 2016 Annual Report is out! It provides an overview of our activities and achievements.

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Syria, Aleppo, Al-Kallaseh district. The remains of an ambulance in the debris. Event

Current Issues in Armed Conflicts

29- June 2017

This one and a half-day conference, organized by the Geneva Academy and the Human Rights Centre of the University of Essex, will address contemporary issues in armed conflicts.

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Libya,  Misrata.Tripoli street after heavy fighting has taken place. IHL Talk

Special Panel on Libya

June 2017, 18:00-19:30

This IHL Talk, organized with the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), will discuss the legal and political challenges faced by the country, including the protection of migrants and the role that different actors play in terrorism networks.

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Rafah, 2009. The ICRC provides the farmers located in the buffer zones with wheat seeds Training

12th Advanced Seminar in International Humanitarian Law for University Lecturers and Researchers

25- September 2017

Organized by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the Geneva Academy, the 12th edition of this advanced seminar aims to enhance the capacity of lecturers and researchers to teach and research international humanitarian law (IHL) contemporary issues, addressing both substantive and pedagogical aspects.

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Screenshot of the RULAC webpage Project

Rule of Law in Armed Conflicts (RULAC)

Started in May 2007

The Rule of Law in Armed Conflicts project (RULAC) is a unique online portal that identifies and classifies all situations of armed violence that amount to an armed conflict under international humanitarian law (IHL). It is primarily a legal reference source for a broad audience, including non-specialists, interested in issues surrounding the classification of armed conflicts under IHL.

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Putis, Peru. The clothes of missing child found in a mass grave close to the village at the exhibition organized for the relatives of victimes. The family will be able to identify their missing relatives. Project

The Duty to Investigate Under International Law

Started in January 2014

This project, initiated in 2014 by the Swiss Chair of International Humanitarian Law, Professor Noam Lubell, intends to identify, via expert meetings and research, a set of best practices that states should apply when they investigate or examine alleged violations or misconduct in situations of armed conflict.

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