Disruptive Military Technologies

Started in February 2020

Context

New (military) technologies are set to revolutionize the ways wars are fought. Significant advances in the fields of cyberspace, artificial intelligence, robotics and space technology are at the forefront of contemporary geopolitical power struggles and are already bringing about major transformative shifts in military and humanitarian affairs. Developments in the area of nanotechnology, human enhancement and genetic engineering are also raising a range of ethical and legal concerns. Undoubtedly, these developments will have far-reaching and not yet fully understood consequences for future humanitarian protection needs and the humanitarian and international legal framework at large.

Objectives

Via a new lecture series on disruptive military technologies, this project aims at:

  • Staying abreast of the various military technology trends
  • Promoting legal and policy debate on new military technologies
  • Furthering the understanding of the convergent effects of different technological trends shaping the digital battlefield of the future.

RESEARCHERS

Portrait of Robin Geiss

Robin Geiß

Swiss Chair of International Humanitarian Law at the Geneva Academy and Professor of International Law and Security at the University Of Glasgow

Robin Geiß has taught, researched and published on a variety of topics related to international humanitarian law, human rights law and the legal and ethical implications of new technologies, and is recognized as a leading expert in these fields.

Chiara Redaelli

Research Fellow

Chiara Redaelli's areas of expertise include international humanitarian law, jus ad bellum, and international human rights law.

Portrait of Henning Lahmann

Henning Lahmann

Associate Researcher

Henning Lahmann participates in the research at the Geneva Academy on disruptive military technologies.

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