Event information

8 March 2017, 18:00-19:30
Register start 16 February 2017
Register end 8 March 2017

Downloads

Flyer >

How Does Operational Law Constrain the Use of Force in Military Operations?

Military Briefings

The Desert Reconnaissance Battalion Conducts Drill in the Urban Warfare Center The Desert Reconnaissance Battalion Conducts Drill in the Urban Warfare Center

In today’s environment, armed forces have to take on a wide array of missions, ranging from combat to humanitarian relief operations, and including peacekeeping and peace enforcement operations. These multifaceted missions and their outcomes are shaped by an increasingly broad and complex body of norms. The law of military operations, also called “operational law”, refers to the body of international, national legal and even hybrid rules applicable to the planning and conduct of military operations. What are the main sources and norms constituting the body of operational law? How does operational law authorize or constrain the use to lethal force in combat and other operations? What is the scope of soldiers’ right to self-defense? How does it relate to human rights or international humanitarian law norms regulating the use of force?

This third Military Briefing aims to untangle the web of rules applicable to the use of lethal force by the military. Dr. Aurel Sari from the University of Exeter will provide a general overview of the law of military operations as a field of study and practice, including its main branches and sources. In discussion with Dr. Gloria Gaggioli, he will reflect on some of the questions which most critically impact the legality of lethal force, such as the applicability of the human right to life to air operations, or the scope of soldiers’ right to self-defense and its relevance in today’s military operations.

Briefing by

Dr Aurel Sari, Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Exeter, Fellow of the Allied Rapid Reaction Corps (NATO)

Discussant

Dr Gloria Gaggioli, Assistant Professor and Grant Holder of Excellence at the University of Geneva, former Stockton Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at the U.S. Naval War College.

About Military Briefings

Military Briefings are a unique series of events relating to military institutions and the law. They aim to improve our students’ knowledge of military actors and operations and build bridges between the military and civilian worlds.

Location

Villa Moynier, 120B Rue de Lausanne, Geneva

Access

Public Transport

Tram 15, Direction Nations - tram stop Butini

Bus 1 or 25, Direction Jardin Botanique - bus stop Sécheron

Access for People with Disabilities

Villa Moynier is accessible to people with disabilities. If you have a disability or any additional needs and require assistance in order to participate fully, please email info@geneva-academy.ch

MORE ON THIS THEMATIC AREA

Portrait of Sonali Wanigabaduge News

MAS in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law: What our Students Say

6 January 2020

In this interview, Sonali Wanigabaduge, who is enrolled in our Master of Advanced Studies (MAS) in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law, tells us about the programme and life in Geneva.

Read more

Participants in the Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict News

19 Professionals Start the Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict

14 October 2019

Coming from 18 different countries, they work as diplomats, lawyers as well as for NGOs, UN agencies, the International Committee of the Red Cross and academic institutions.

Read more

Event

Surviving Syria's Gulag: The Struggle of Sednaya’s Former Detainees for Justice and Accountability

22 January 2020, 18:00-19:30

Panelists will discuss the struggle of Sednaya's former detainees for justice and accountability, and explore the role of current justice and redress initiatives in the contexts of universal jurisdiction and in the documentation of violations.

Read more

Afghanistan, Parwan detention facility. Inside a room where detainees of the prison, separated by an acrylic glass, are allowed to meet with their families a couple of times per year with the help of the ICRC employees who facilitate the programme. Short Course

Preventing and Combating Terrorism

27 February - 19 March 2020

This short course discusses the extent to which states may  limit and/or derogate from their international human rights obligations in order to prevent and counter terrorism and thus protect persons under their jurisdiction.

Read more

An aerial view of camps for internally displaced persons (IDPs), which have appeared following latest attacks by M23 rebels and other armed groups in the North Kivu region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Short Course

International Refugee Law

6 March - 9 April 2020

This short course analyses the main international and regional norms governing the international protection of refugees. It notably examines the sources of international refugee law, including the 1951 Geneva Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, and their interaction with human rights law and international humanitarian law.

Read more

Central African Republic, Ouham province, village of Ouogo. International Humanitarian Law dissemination session to members of the Peoples' Army for the Restoration of Democracy. Project

From Words to Deeds: A Study of Armed Non-State Actors’ Practice and Interpretation of International Humanitarian and Human Rights Norms

Started in January 2017

This project aims at compiling and analysing the practice and interpretation of selected international humanitarian law and human rights norms by armed non-state actors (ANSAs). It has a pragmatic double objective: first, to offer a comparative analysis of IHL and human rights norms from the perspective of ANSAs, and second, to inform strategies of humanitarian engagement with ANSAs, in particular the content of a possible ‘Model Code of Conduct’.

Read more

Séléka rebels patrol in the town of Bria, Central African Republic (CAR). Project

Human Rights Responsibilities and Armed Non-State Actors

Started in June 2018

This research aims at building a common understanding and vision as to how states and the relevant parts of the UN system can provide a concrete and practical framework to address human rights responsibilities of armed non-state actors.

Read more

Cover of the publication Publication

From Words to Deeds: A Study of Armed Non-State Actors’ Practice and Interpretations of International Humanitarian and Human Rights Norms

published on December 2019

Annyssa Bellal, Pascal Bongard, Ezequiel Heffes

Read more

Cover page of the article Publication

Iraq: Any Hope for Change?

published on November 2019

Josiane Matar

Read more