MAS in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law: What our Students Say

Portrait of Anthoula Bourolias in the Library of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies Portrait of Anthoula Bourolias in the Library of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies

15 January 2019

In this interview, Anthoula Bourolias, currently enrolled in our Master of Advanced Studies in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law (MTJ), tells us about the programme and life in Geneva.

About Me

My name is Anthoula Bourolias, and I was born and raised in Toronto, Canada. Prior to joining the Geneva Academy, I completed an Honors Bachelor of Arts Degree at the University of Toronto where I majored in African Studies and minored in Political Science and History. Here, I had the opportunity to conduct field research on human rights violations in East Africa, mainly in Rwanda and Kenya. Subsequently, I worked at an indigenous rights law firm in Toronto as a legal assistant and researcher for the National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

In addition to my academic and career-oriented passions, I love to travel, weightlift, cook and spend quality time with my family. I am also a native Greek and English speaker and have basic Swahili proficiency.

Why did you choose the MTJ at the Geneva Academy?

Applying to the Geneva Academy was an easy decision for me. Having worked on transitional justice and human rights issues in Canada and East Africa, I was quickly drawn to the Geneva Academy’s unique reputation. As an academic institution, it is upon few, world-wide, that embodies a multi-interdisciplinary approach to learning about the complexities, challenges, and approaches to dealing with mass human rights violations in post-conflict societies.

What are you Enjoying about your Studies?

There is never a dull moment at the Geneva Academy because it is not a conventional master’s programme. Rather, it hosts a wide variety of unique features such as the TJ cafes, conferences and events, an individualized track system, the Spring School, and a study trip. All of these features encourage a professionalizing and diversified approach to learning.

How is the Teaching?

What I admire most about the MTJ programme is the diverse faculty: professors are among the best scholars and practitioners in the field of transitional justice and international human rights law. They inspire students to engage, innovate, and collaborate in and out of the classroom, which creates a stimulating and dynamic learning experience.

What are you Planning to do Next?

I plan to continue academic research by pursuing a PhD. The Geneva Academy supports this endeavour specifically through the Academic Research Track which prepares students for doctoral-level research. I am particularly interested in conducting further research on the concept of reconciliation, and memory/forgiveness in post-conflict settings.

Why did you choose to be photographed in the Graduate Institute’s Library?

This particular spot reminds me of my first week of class where I ventured into this beautiful library, wandering through the stacks, amazed by the collection. I thought to myself… I am here and this is really happening.

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