Leading Academics Will Address the Use of Less-Lethal Weapons for Law Enforcement Purpose

A desk with books and publications A desk with books and publications

5 March 2018

Leading academics, law enforcement experts and practitioners from different regions and legal backgrounds, and representatives from international organizations and civil society will join an academic working group to discuss use of force challenges in different contexts.

This academic working-group will address strategic approaches and responses to specific use of force issues like less lethal weapons, crowd control or the use of new technologies. Its composition will vary according to the topics discussed.

‘It was important for us to bring together leading use of force actors and institutions to reflect upon existing challenges and the way to address them’ underlines Kamelia Kemileva, Executive Manager at the Geneva Academy.

Under the Umbrella of the Geneva Human Rights Platform

This academic working-groups forms part of the Geneva Human Rights Platform, which notably focuses on current human rights challenges related to the use of force.

‘The Geneva Human Rights Platform, hosted by the Geneva Academy, provides a dynamic forum in Geneva for all stakeholders in the field of human rights to discuss and debate topical issues and challenges’ recalls Kamelia Kemileva. ‘The objective is to foster interactions and discussions on topical issues and challenges through regular events, conferences, expert roundtables and private meetings’ she adds.

 A Focus on Less-Lethal Weapons for Law Enforcement Purposes

The academic working-group will start working on the issue of less-lethal weapons (LLW) for law enforcement purposes, related human rights challenges and the lack of international regulation and standards.

The objective is to develop a document to guide practice concerning the use of LLW and other equipment in law enforcement. This document will build on, and in no way challenge or update, the UN Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Officials and the UN Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials.

‘This issue is currently discussed at the UN Human Rights Council, at the UN Human Rights Committee and at the Conference on Disarmament, but also at the national and regional levels. It is therefore important to provide guidance on the human rights challenges related to the use of LLW and how to address them’ underlines Kamelia Kemileva.

MORE ON THIS THEMATIC AREA

Building of the European Commission in Brussels News

Inputting the EU Revision on Seed Marketing

31 March 2022

As the EU is revising its legislation on seed marketing, the Geneva Academy is inputting this process to ensure that the UN Declaration on the Rights of Peasants and its article 19 on the right to seeds are taken into account.

Read more

Destroyed building, Ukraine News

Time to Apply to our Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict

2 May 2022

Applications for the upcoming academic year of our Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict are open. They will run until 30 June 2022 – meaning that interested candidates have two months to apply – with courses starting at the end of September 2022.

Read more

A general view of participants during of the 33nd ordinary session of the Human Rights Council. Training

The Universal Periodic Review and the UN Human Rights System: Raising the Bar on Accountability

14-18 November 2022

This training course will explore the origin and evolution of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) and its functioning in Geneva and will focus on the nature of implementation of the UPR recommendations at the national level.

Read more

Prison visit by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in Haiti Short Course

The Implementation of International Human Rights Law

Fall 2022

This short course, which can be followed in Geneva or online, aims at presenting the institutions and procedures in charge of the implementation of international human rights law.

Read more

Session of a UN Treaty Body Project

Treaty Bodies Individual Communications Procedures

Started in January 2019

Read more

Universal Declaration of Human Rights Project

The Universality of Human Rights: Developing Narratives to Help Overcome Polarization

Started in January 2020

This research aims at taking stock of and contributing to a better understanding of the above-mentioned challenges to the principle of universality of human rights while also questioning their validity. It will identify relevant political and legal arguments and develop counter-narratives that could be instrumental to dealing with and/or overcoming the polarization of negotiations processes at the multilateral level.

Read more

Cover of the publication Publication

Implementing the Treaty Body Review 2020 – Where do we stand

published on May 2022

Felix Kirchmeier, Chloé Naret, Domenico Zipoli

Read more